Screening Program

Health Screenings

Routine health screenings can be the first step in discovering a life-threatening or serious health condition. They also can be a way to monitor the status of an existing diagnosis. Health screenings may raise your awareness of conditions that you can reverse with lifestyle changes or corrected with medical intervention at an early stage. And they could help you avoid a future health emergency.

At Indiana University Health Goshen, we offer a variety of health screenings to the community. You can get answers from our health professionals about your health concerns, as well as get next-step recommendations, based on your results. Results from these health screens take less than 10 minutes.

Screenings

When: Please call 877.566.4660 for a current listing of screening dates, times and locations
Where: Locations vary at IU Health Goshen Hospital
Cost: Some screenings are provided free, others require payment of a nominal fee, depending on the type of screening requested

To register for a health screening, please call 877.566.4660.

Types of health screenings

Fasting Lipid Profile (12-hour fast required)—Measures total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, cholesterol ratio, and blood sugar

Non-fasting Lipid Profile—Measures total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, cholesterol ratio, and blood sugar

Liver Health Screening—Assesses liver function for persons taking some cholesterol lowering medications, high doses of NSAIDS or some diabetic medications

Bone Density—Heel scan to assess risk of fracture due to bone density loss

Blood Pressure, Pulse and Blood Oxygen Levels

Muscle, Joint and Balance Screenings

Body Composition Assessment—Measures percentage of body fat, height/weight and body mass index

Risk Assessment for Diabetes

Vascular Screenings—3-part ultrasound test series for arterial and peripheral arterial disease (PAD)

Breast Cancer Risk Assessment

Colon Health Risk Appraisal

Lung Health Assessment

Skin Cancer Risk Screening

Sleep Apnea Risk Assessment

Fitness Assessment

Heart Failure Risk Assessment

Diabetic Foot Screening

A1C Measures—Measures a diabetic’s blood sugar control over the previous 2-3 months

Lower Extremity Pulses Screening—Assesses lower extremity blood flow

Take charge of your health

Being tested for diseases at recommended ages can save your life, even when you don’t have symptoms. Screening tests, such as colonoscopy or mammograms, can find diseases early when they may be easier to treat. Use this guide when you see your medical practitioner and discuss screenings that can prevent future problems.

This checklist is only a guideline. Talk to your medical practitioner about which of the tests and immunizations listed below are right for you – when you should have them, and how often – based on your personal risk factors and family history.

Screening Tests for Women

 

Screening Tests Frequency  
Mammograms Every year Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 (2)
Colorectal Cancer Tests Every 5-10 years Begin regular screening for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. Your medical practitioner can help you decide which test is right for you. How often you need to be tested will depend on which test you have. (1.2.3.)
Pap Smears Every 1-3 years Have a Pap smear every 1-3 years if you have been sexually active or are older than 21. (1,2,3,4)
Diabetes Tests Consult your medical practitioner Have a test to screen for diabetes if you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol. (1)
Cholesterol Checks Every 5 years Have your cholesterol checked at least every 5 years, starting at age 45. If you smoke, have diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, start having your cholesterol checked at age 20. (1)
Skin Cancer Screening

Every 3 years

Every year
 

Have a skin cancer screening every 3 years, starting at age 20.
Begin screening every year at age 40. (2)
 
Tests for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Consult your medical practitioner If you are 25 or younger and are sexually active, you should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases, including Chlamydia. If you are older, talk to your medical practitioner to see whether you should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases. (1)
Blood Pressure Every 2 years Have your blood pressure checked at least every 2 years. (1)
Depression Consult your medical practitioner If you've felt down, sad, or hopeless, or felt little interest or pleasure in doing things for 2 weeks straight, talk to your medical practitioner about whether he or she can screen you for depression. (1,4)
Osteoporosis Tests   Have a bone density test at age 65 to screen for osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). If you are between the ages of 60 and 64 and weigh 154 lbs. or less, talk to your medical practitioner about whether you should be tested. (1,4)
Thyroid Tests Every 5 years Have your thyroid levels checked at least every 5 years, starting at age 35.5 (5)
Immunizations    
Flu Every year Have a flu shot every year, starting at age 50 (3)
Tetanus-diphtheria Every 10 years Have a tetanus-diphtheria shot every 10 years. (3)
Pneumonia Consult your medical practitioner Have a pneumonia shot once at age 65 (you may need it earlier if you have certain health problems, such as lung disease). (3)
Hepatitis B Consult your medical practitioner Talk to your medical practitioner to see whether you need hepatitis B shots. (3)
  1. The Guide to Clinical Preventative Services, 2005, Recommendations of the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, US Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. www.ahrq.gov
  2. American Cancer Society. www.cancer.org
  3. Centers for Disease Control. www.cdc.gov
  4. American Academy of Family Physicians. www.aafp.org
  5. American Thyroid Association. www.thyroid.gov

Screening Tests for Men
 

Screening Tests Frequency  
Blood Pressure Every 2 years Have your blood pressure checked at least every 2 years. (1)
Colorectal Cancer Tests Every 5-10 years Begin regular screening for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. Your medical practitioner can help you decide which test is right for you. How often you need to be tested will depend on which test you have. (1.2.3.)
Diabetes Tests Consult your medical practitioner Have a test to screen for diabetes if you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol. (1)
Cholesterol Checks Every 5 years Have your cholesterol checked at least every 5 years, starting at age 45. If you smoke, have diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, start having your cholesterol checked at age 20. (1)
Skin Cancer Screening

Every 3 years

Every year

Have a skin cancer screening every 3 years, starting at age 20.
Begin screening every year at age 40. (2)
 
Test for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Consult your medical practitioner If you are 25 or younger and are sexually active, you should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases, including Chlamydia. If you are older, talk to your medical practitioner to see whether you should be tested for sexually transmitted diseases. (1)
Blood Pressure Every 2 years Have your blood pressure checked at least every 2 years. (1)
Depression Consult your medical practitioner If you've felt down, sad, or hopeless, or felt little interest or pleasure in doing things for 2 weeks straight, talk to your medical practitioner about whether he or she can screen you for depression. (1,4)
Prostate Cancer Screenings Consult your medical practitioner Talk to your medical practitioner about the possible benefits and harms of prostate cancer screening if you are considering having a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test or digital rectal examination (DRE). (1,2)
Thryoid Tests Every 5 years Have your thyroid levels checked at least every 5 years, starting at age 35.5 (5)
Immunizations    
Flu Every year Have a flu shot every year, starting at age 50 (3)
Tetanus-diphtheria Every 10 years Have a tetanus-diphtheria shot every 10 years. (3)
Pneumonia Consult your medical practitioner Have a pneumonia shot once at age 65 (you may need it earlier if you have certain health problems, such as lung disease). (3)
Hepatitis B Consult your medical practitioner Talk to your medical practitioner to see whether you need hepatitis B shots. (3)
     
  1. The Guide to Clinical Preventative Services, 2005, Recommendations of the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, US Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. www.ahrq.gov
  2. American Cancer Society. www.cancer.org
  3. Centers for Disease Control. www.cdc.gov
  4. American Academy of Family Physicians. www.aafp.org
  5. American Thyroid Association. www.thyroid.gov